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Journal #2 Baskerville

This an example of early type specimen of Baskervillle. This was made from an early printing press made by John Baskerville himself. Since then Baskerville font has been has been made into many different typefaces.

Quick Bio-

    John Baskerville was born in Worcestershire, England. He began a career in manufacturing, making japanned ware (a type of lacquered metalware popular at the time).  Around 1751, Baskerville began experimenting with printing.  Baskerville’s type was influenced by the works of Italian renaissance printers, like his English contemporary, William Caslon. But Baskerville is creating type with more refined their forms and more extreme contrast of thick and thin strokes. His designs stand as a pinnacle of pinnacle of transitional typography and as a prelude to the modern Didone design of later years. His influence on type and printing spread to Italy and France where Giovanni Battista Bodoni and the Didots furthered his ideas.  Baskerville’s types have been the source of many revivals, some of which include: John Baskerville by Storm Type Foundry and Mrs Eaves by Zuzana Licko.

This is an example Mrs. Eaves. Looking at this you can really tell the difference in the ligatures and problems it has in spacing compared to Baskerville.

 

Identifying Characteristics-

  • Tail on the lowercase g does not close
  • Swash-like tail of Q
  • Small counter of italic e compared to italic a
  • J well below baseline
  • High crossbar and pointed apex of A
  • Top and bottom serifs on C
  • W and w have no middle stroke
  • Long lower arm of E
  • Many version feature a calligraphic J
  • T has wide arms

 

Mrs. Eaves Vs. Baskerville-

    Mrs. Eaves, by Zuzana Licko, is revival of Baskerville that attempts to soften hard edges by reducing its contrast, lowering the x-height, and widening the lower case.  Mrs. Eaves has many problems for instance that it has spacing problems. It has tiny x-heights and the lightish color.  You cannot use it small and you cannot use it large.   It is consider to be the feminine version of Baskerville.   With Baskerville it is very versatile.  It can be used large or small.

All the versions-

    Baskerville has many different version being alter many times.

  • This is a great example of Baskerville still being used today!

    Baskerville

  • ITC new Baskerville
  • Baskerville No. 2
  • Berthold Baskerville Book BE
  • TS Old Baskervillle
  • Baskerville No. 2
  • Baskerville Old Face
  • URW Baskerville AI
  • TS Baskerville
  • URW Baskerville
  • Baskerville Old Face SB
  • Baskerville Old Face SH
  • Baskerville Old Face EF
  • Baskerville Cyrillic
  • Baskerville Original Pro
  • Baskerville Serial
  • Etc.

 

References-

 http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/storm/baskerville-original-pro/

http://www.rightreading.com/typehead/baskerville.htm

http://typophile.com/node/12622

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Comments on: "Journal #2 Baskerville" (1)

  1. Just noticed Jojo!

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